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GWENT Esports: A Geographical Analysis

by David “ImpetuousPanda” Gil Nolskog

GWENT’s competitive scene is an international amalgam of countries spread out throughout various continents and boasting a vast array of languages and cultures. In order to help fans understand the current competitive scene and its demographics, I decided to look at the distribution of Crown Points confronted with the amount of representatives of the GWENT pro scene top countries. Using the official GWENT Masters Crown Points Ranking, I filtered players by total Crown Points earned throughout the Circuit’s existence and based my analysis on said data.

The Crown Points Global Ranking is not a definitive ranking system for player skill, nor is it a fleshed out ELO system. Although, for the most part, it will accurately compare and rank players based on their skill, it is important to note that player consistency in the Pro Ladder and the amount of seasons they have been competing in directly affect the rankings. Also to keep in mind, all of these top 100 players have earned over 50 or more points since the Circuit’s inception. With these disclaimers out of the way, let’s get right into it.

Quantity — Region Comparison 

Among the top 100 players, we find a total of 28 different countries, with a grand majority in the European region. The only region with no representation is Africa. All other regions have ample representation, with the breakdown being as follows:
  • Europe: 72% of players from twenty-three countries
  • Asia: 18% from two countries
  • Americas: 9% from two countries
  • Oceania: 1% from one country
As we can see, Europe dominates the competitive scene — not a surprise, thanks in part to CDPR being located in Central Europe and GWENT’s European powerhouse nations, Poland and Germany, accounting for a massive 30% of players. Asia is single-handedly positioned second thanks to the growing Chinese competitive scene, taking over 16% of the top 100, with Japan adding another two players. Both North and South America combine for 9% of the top 100.

Quality — Region Comparison

Not only the quantity of players from a specific region or country is important, but also the overall position on the rankings that it occupies. To calculate this, I find the average CP a player in the top 100 has earned, which is 106, and compare it to the CP each specific region’s average player has earned. The results are as following:
  • Oceania: An average of 143 CP for 1 player
  • Europe: An average of 113 CP between 72 players
  • Asia: An average of 90 CP between 18 players
  • Americas: An average of 85 CP between 9 players
This leads me to believe that a higher percentage of European players are located in the top 50 positions on the rankings, as the average between all European players is 7 Crown Points above the general average. This cements Europe’s dominance not only in player count but also positioning. Asia’s lower CP average is not surprising, as only 20% of Asian players are in the upper half of the top 100. Regardless, thanks in part to the region’s star player, Hanachan, they maintain a respectable 90 CP average per player. The Americas fall to a lower average, but for different reasons. Unlike other regions, there have been no majorly successful players, and so the average is composed entirely of players spread out throughout the middle-lower tiers of the ranking. Without an outlier to pull the average higher, the Americas claim the lowest region average in GWENT esports. Although Oceania seems to be miles ahead of any other region, it’s due to its sole representative, the Australian i_aPOROgise, who holds the 19th position on the ranking.

The Final Countdown

The Bottom rungs — Positions #10 through #28

With little actual relevance in the tournament scene, these countries and their respective players are mostly known for their consistency on the Pro Ladder, finishing among the top 100 every season, but never breaking into the spotlight. These players will have to step it up if they want to put their country on the map for all of GWENT’s competitive fans. The only countries with notable players in these positions are the following: The Netherlands in 23rd with GWENT Open #4 participant lbdutchboy; Australia, with recent Challenger #3 participant i_aPOROgise in 15th; and the United Kingdom in 11th, with famous tournament player Freddybabes. 

Crown Points Rankings by Country
  1. Poland: 2,287 CP from 19 representatives
  2. China: 1,445 CP from 16 representatives
  3. Germany: 1,382 CP from 11 representatives
  4. Russia: 841 CP from 8 representatives
  5. United States: 583 CP from 7 representatives
  6. Austria: 556 CP from 3 representatives
  7. Czech Republic: 462 CP from 5 representatives
  8. Spain: 338 CP from 3 representatives
  9. Ukraine: 322 CP from 2 representatives
  10. Belgium: 280 CP from 2 representatives
  11. United Kingdom: 274 CP from 2 representatives
  12. Belarus: 238 CP from 2 representatives
  13. Brazil: 182 CP from 2 representatives
  14. Japan: 177 CP from 2 representatives
  15. Australia: 143 CP from 1 representative
  16. France: 134 CP from 1 representative
  17. Italy: 128 CP from 2 representatives
  18. Switzerland: 125 CP from 1 representative
  19. Latvia: 119 CP from 1 representative
  20. Finland: 117 CP from 2 representatives
  21. Sweden: 90 CP from 1 representative
  22. Serbia: 80 CP from 1 representative
  23. Netherlands: 76 CP from 1 representative
  24. Ireland: 72 CP from 1 representative
  25. Greece: 61 CP from 1 representative
  26. Denmark: 60 CP from 1 representative
  27. Bulgaria: 54 CP from 1 representative
  28. Hungary: 50 CP from 1 representative

See also

The Evolution of GWENT’s Factions

Imagine for a moment that you are the Lady of Time and Space herself, Ciri, and you’ve just travelled back to November 2016. Would you recognise the GWENT you’ve devoted hundreds of hours to? While it’s enjoyed a loyal following, there are many popular players that weren’t around during the very early days of Closed Beta. This was back when there wasn’t even a ranked mode and a “pro ladder” was the stuff of a Dragons Dream. The archetypes that made up the various factions have been through months of evolution – something which we recently covered in “5 Gwent cards that defined the past” – but with everyone gearing up for Homecoming, let’s take a more in-depth look at how the factions have changed.

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